Temporal networks and the extraordinary fluidity of effortless abstractions

This is a semi-grumpy post about the many ambiguities and reinventions in the field of temporal networks. Cheerful posts are more fun, so do consider browsing away. Also, I’m not always contributing to clarity myself, so maybe I’m not entitled to whine about this. Many types of data consist of discrete interaction events, where we […]

Intro video to the history and ideas of complexity science and networks

I needed a video presenting the historical development of ideas behind the complexity and network science in 20 minutes—an impossible task of course (especially since I couldn’t spend too much time on prepping it). Anyway, someone out there could be interested, so here it is: Some credits not stated in the video: The starling murmuration […]

50 years of limits to growth

In my closest scientific surrounding, The Limits to Growth is surprisingly unknown, so at its 50th anniversary, this blog post is an intro + my reflections. For short, it’s a fascinating story of what happens when computational social science makes a splash. If we interpret computational social science literally—not just meaning social media data mining—its […]

That ole Illustrator magic

After making a figure with your favorite software—matplotlib, R, Matlab, gnuplot, etc.—there are usually many details that could need a touch-up. In collaborations, somehow that’s usually my job. Maybe partly because I’ve been using Illustrator since I-forgot-when, so I acquired some speed. I also love graphic design and am teaching scientific visualization (two areas with […]

For the love of hens

In the first few years of the last century, during his summer breaks at a farm, Norwegian schoolboy Thorleif Schjelderup-Ebbe spent time observing chicken. He noticed that when hens peck on each other—as they do when they fight, typically about food—they follow specific patterns. If hen A pecked on hen B, B would not peck […]